In vitro Phytochemical Screening and Anti-snake Venom Activity of the Methanol Leaf and Stem Bark Extracts of Leptadenia hastata (Asclepiadaceae) against Naja nigricollis

  • L. G. Hassan Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Sokoto, Sokoto State, Nigeria
  • A. J. Yusuf Department of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria
  • N. Muhammad Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Sokoto, Sokoto State, Nigeria
  • Cyril Ogbiko Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Sokoto, Sokoto State, Nigeria
  • M. D. Mustapha Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Sokoto, Sokoto State, Nigeria
Keywords: Leptadenia hastata, Phytochemical, Snake venom

Abstract

Snake envenomation is a major cause of death and morbidity in many developing countries. Leptadenia hastata (Pers.) Decne (Asclepiadaceae) has been reportedly used in traditional medicine as an antivenom, antiulcer, antidiabetic, analgesic, cardiovascular disorders, bacterial and viral infections. This research design is to investigate the phytochemical analysis and phospholipase A2 enzyme inhibition potential of L. hastata leaf and stem bark extracts using standard procedures. Preliminary phytochemical screening revealed the presence of key constituents such as carbohydrates, tannins, flavonoids, alkaloids, triterpenes, steroids, saponins, and diterpenes. The methanol leaf and stem extracts were able to inhibit the hydrolytic action of phospholipase A2 enzyme in a concentration-dependent manner. The research findings lay credence to the folkloric claim of the leaf and stem of L. hastata as an anti-snake venom.

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Published
2020-08-05
How to Cite
Hassan, L. G., Yusuf, A. J., Muhammad, N., Ogbiko, C., & Mustapha, M. D. (2020). In vitro Phytochemical Screening and Anti-snake Venom Activity of the Methanol Leaf and Stem Bark Extracts of Leptadenia hastata (Asclepiadaceae) against Naja nigricollis. Asian Pacific Journal of Health Sciences, 7(3), 11-14. https://doi.org/10.21276/apjhs.2020.7.3.3